Richard Cantrell, 1666 – 1753

DRAFT

Richard Cantrell (1666-1753) –> Joseph Cantrell (1695 – 1753) –> John Miller Cantrell  (1724-1803) –> Charles Cantrell (1752-1841) –> Joseph Cantrell –> John Milton Cantrell –> William Riley Cantrell –> Richard Burgess Cantrell –> Richard Carlton Cantrell –> Richard Ward Cantrell

Notes on Richard Cantrell,  of Derbyshire and Philadelphia.  Misc. sources.

Book text:

http://archive.org/stream/cantrillcantrell00chri/cantrillcantrell00chri_djvu.txt

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  • Cantrell history

  • From: <DisplayMail(‘aol.com’,’KDedman835 ‘);KDedman835@aol.com>Subject: Re: CANTRELL-D Digest V99 #51 Date: Mon, 16 Aug 1999 21:18:11 EDT

     I thought you might find this info interesting. It is from the book “Cantrill-Cantrell Genealogy”, by Susan Cantrell-Christie. -CANTRELL- ORIGIN AND SPELLING OF THE NAMEEXCERPTS OF THE CANTRELL HISTORY Wherever found, the name can be traced to the original family of Chantrelle or Cantrelle, in France. In Armorial Gen-erale by J.B. Riestap, the name is given as Chantrell, Cantrelle and Canterall; in LaGrande Encyclopedia, as Chantrell and Canteral; in LaFrance Heraldique” as Chantrell(de) and Chantre(le); while in Nobilisse Universale, by M. L.Vicomte Magny, it is given as Cantrel. In British Family Names by Henry Barber, the following appears: “Cantrell (French), Can-trel, Chantrell. The first mention of the name outside of France is William Chantrell, who retained the French spelling of the name in England in the time of King John,A.D. 1199. Mark Antony Lower gives the definition thus: “Cantrell, Cantrell, from Cantrellus, the little singer.” Charles William Bardsley, in his Dictionary of Surnames, says: “Cantrell, Cantrill, one who rang the Chantrelle. Chantrelle, a small bell. Chanter, to sing.” The name is spelled in various ways: Cantrill, Cantrell, Cantrall, Cantrelle, Cantril, Cantrel, Chantrell, and Chauntrell. The spelling hasalways been one of personal taste; even brothers have spelled it differently. THE FAMILY IN ENGLAND In the History of Melbourne, County Derby, second edition, by J.J. Briggs, the author says: The Cantrells were a very ancient family and are supposed to have been located at Kings Newton for about five hundred years. By deeds ex-tant in the family, we find that they possessed lands there as early as the reign of Henry V, and 1413. Other deeds and surveys show considerable landed proprietors during the reigns of Henry V, Henry VI, Edward VI and Henry VII.” Ormeod’s History of Cheshire says the Chantrells were possessed in Cheshire as early as 1412 and in his History, the pedigree is given of John Cantrell, 1424 (taken from Plea Recog Rolls), with the same coat-of-arms that is given later in the Visitation of Cheshire, 1580, of Cantrell of Bache; Visitation of Suffolk, 1612, of Cantrell of Bury St. Edmonds, and Visitation of Berkshire, 1664, of Cantrill of Workingham. Various histories of Cheshire have a great many records, covering a period from 1422-1558, showing that thefamily of Chantrell was a prominent one and that they were large landed proprietors, and speaking of the family as a very ancient one. The name is enrolled in English records for patriots, soldiers, sailors,college graduates, schoolmasters, barristers, writers, rectors and vicars of the Church of England.Hugh Cantrell was an archer in the retinue of Lord Grey of Godner at the Agincourt Battle in 1415.John Chantrell received special favors from the Prince of Wales in 1400 for good service at the Battle of Bloreheth. William Cantrell, a Master in His Majesty’s Navy, particularly distinguished himself in Trecomale, in the East Indies, December 16, 1847, on an occasion where few would perhaps have shown the same contempt of danger. In bringing powder from the magazine, one of the boats blew up and a large firebrand fell blazing into another boat in which were 45 barrels of powder, covered only by a sail; it stove one of the barrels and must have inevitably sent all of the people employed into the air, had not Mr. Cantrell taken the burning brand from the powder, thrown it overboard, quenched the remains of the fire on the sail and restored all to safety. There are many records in Derbyshire of the Cantrell, or Cantrill, family (as the name is alternately spelled), which was closely identified with St.Alkmund’s Church over a century. St. Alkmund’s Church is believed to have been founded as early as the ninth century and undoubtedly is the oldest church in Derby. In the Register of this church is an autobiog-raphy of John Cantrell, minister and schoolmaster, covering a period from 1627 to 1656. John Cantrell had a son Simon Cantrell who was the father of Henry Cantrell, a writer and Vicar of St. Alkmund’s for fifty years, in whose honor there is a flag within the Commune Rails of the church. There is a tablet on the south wall of the chancel of the same church to Wil-liam Cantrell, a son ofHenry, who was rector many years at St. Michael’s in the borough of Stamford, and in the counties of Lincoln and Rutland. There are also many interesting records of the Suffolk Branch of the family. Ralph Cantrell, Gentleman of Thorpe Hall, Hemingstone, county Suffolk, was Scribe to the Bishop (Lord Norwich, 1519-79), and his pedigree is given in the Visitation of Suffolk, 1612, and of Berkshire, 1774. Many records are found of his sons. One son was William Cantrell of whom we learn in the Antiquities of the County Suffolk, Vol. 1, page 118. Prior to being beheaded by Queen Elizabeth, Thomas Duke of Norfolk put his vast estates in trust to William Cantrell and others. The queen had the Duke continue to act as trustee until she sent the Earl of Arudenl to the Tower. At that time, she appointed William Cantrell to act for her. Mr. William Cantrell of Hemingstone was considered a gentleman of fortune and consequence in the reigns of King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth who granted him marks of royal favor and confidence. Williams’s brother, Thomas Cantrell, was the father of Ralph Cantrell of Hemingstone, who was knighted March 11, 1623. THE FAMILY IN AMERICA The name of Cantrell first appears at Jamestown, Virginia. Since then there have been eight, possibly more, distinct families of Cantrill, Cantrell and Cantrelle, who have come to this country from England, Ireland and France. The first permanent settlement of English speaking on the American continent was made at Jamestown, VA, in April 1607. The history of all the older nations begin with a fable or some mythological story which shrouds their real birth in mystery. However, the American Republic can trace its genesis to a definite place. Captain John Smith was the leader of this first settlement. Every hardship common to human life was met by the men who founded this first colony. They planted the seed from which have sprung not only the nation, but also its form of gov-ernment. Before 1620 when the second permanent settlement was made at Plymouth, the Virginia Colony had estab-lished a number of villages and trading posts; had built homes and churches, established courts and tried the accused by jury. They had cultivated the land and started a commercial career which was not confined to the colony, as they ex-ported produce to England. From 1608 to 1639, the name Cantrell appears in Virginia records and after that date is found in other and newer set-tlements during that century. William Cantrill, Gentleman, arrived in Jamestown on April 20, 1608, on the ship Phenix. References are made to the “writings of William Cantrill.” Early histories tell us that on June 2, 1608, he was one of the fourteen who accompanied Capt. John Smith on his “discoverie of Chesapeake Bay”. “Cantrill’s Point” was named for the discoverer and was “betwixt the Patawomuk and Pamuke”, now the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers. There is a tra-dition in the family that the Cantrills went up the Delaware from the east shore of Virginia, but it has not been possible to verify this fromincomplete and fragmentary records. About four thousand Virginians were among the first settlers of Maryland and others were scattered along the Delaware into Pennsylvania before William Penn arrived there. Early 1660s Hearth Tax Records of Derbyshire establish that there were several Cantril families living in the shire. Over the years several descendants of the family have traveled to Derbyshire and searched for Richard’s birth and par-entage. In 1986 and 1987, a family researcher located a baptismal record dated May 13, 1666, for Richard Cantrill, son of Richard and Alice Cantrell, in Bakewell Parish, Derbyshire, England. There is evidence that the family was in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Massachusetts before 1700. Unfortu-nately, the relation, if any, that existed among the Cantrells in the various states has not been established. Nor has it been possible to find the exact year in which they moved from one settlement to another during the 17th and 18th centu-ries. Before the Revolution, however, a branch of the Cantrell family had left Pennsylvania and settled in western Virginia and the Carolinas. It is probable that those who went to the Carolinas migrated with little bands of Baptists since they had become identified with the Mother Baptist Church in the Old Welsh Tract of Newcastle County, Pennsylvania. This church sent many branches out into Virginia and the Carolinas about this time. In western Virginia, there were but two denomi-nations at this time, i.e., the Church of England, which was the first established in the Colony, and the Presbyterian, which sprang into prominence when a large emigration of Scotch-Irish settled there about 1750. In England the Cantrells were almost all members of the Church of England and, as previously noted, were rectors and vicars in that church. In Amer-ica, they became members of various religious organizations, being in many instances organizers and founders of churches in different localities of the Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist, Christian and Episcopal denominations, and have furnished many church officers and ministers to them. Today, members of the Cantrell family are found in almost every religious denomination. The Cantrell name is woven into the histories of many states. Todayrepresentatives of the family can be found in almost every state and territory. In the South they have been planters; in the West, farmers; and everywhere merchants, teachers, ministers, physicians, lawyers, judges, and bankers plus city, county and state officials. To the credit of the name, let it be said, we have never found anywhere a single criminal. In every great crisis from pioneers down, the Cantrells have proven themselves to be patriots as well as pioneers. To the Indian Wars; War forAmerican Independence; War of 1812; Mexican War; Black Hawk War; Civil War; and Spanish-American War, can be added World War I, World War II, Korean, Viet Nam and Gulf Wars. The muster rolls have been full of Cantrells fighting for what they deemed right. They make a long Roll of Honor of soldiers, sailors, and airmen – both enlisted and officers. The most prominent characteristics of the family are honesty and courage. As a rule, they are unassuming, conser-vative and quiet in manner. Many of the men are described as tall, being over six feet in height, with Grecian nose, blue-gray eyes and light brown hair, and many are said to be strikingly handsome or fine looking.References: Historie of the Settlement of the Virginias, by Captain John Smith Statues, or the Laws of Virginia, by Henning Genesis of the United States, by Alexander Brown Court Proceedings in Virginia from records of the London Company of Virginia State Papers, Colonial Series, American & West Indies The Cantrill-Cantrell Genealogy, by Susan Cantrell-Christie Pennsylvania Archives, Vol XIXCantrell Family History, by Glenda Ruth Densmore Harrel Early Families of the North Carolina Counties of Rockingham and Stokes, compiled by James Hunter Chapter, National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, Madison, North Carolina CANTRELL GENEALOGY 1. William Cantrell, born about 1580 in Derbyshire, England. Spouse: Mary 2. William Cantrill, Jr. (William Sr.1)3. Henry Cantril (William Jr. 2, William Sr.1), born 1616 in Jamestown, VA. Spouse: unknown. Children: i. Richard ii. Henry, born 1639, Charles, VA, died 1708 4. Richard Cantril (Henry3, William Jr.2, William Sr.1), born 1635, Bakewell Parish, Derbyshire, England, died 1676. Spouse: Alice, born 1640. Richard had a number of children also born in Bakewell Parish. Children: i. Richard 5. Richard L. Cantril, (Richard4, Henry3, William Jr2, William Sr1), born May 1666. Bakewell Parish, Derbyshire, Eng-land, died May 31, 1753, Philadelphia, PA. Arrived USA August 24, 1682 on the ship “Welcome”.Married 1693 to Dorothy Jane Jones, born 1672 in Wales, England, of Quaker parents Ellis Jones & Ellen Jane Evans. Arrived USA September 1682 from either Flint or Denbigh, Wales, on the “Submission”. According to tradition, Richard was a brick maker and a mason who operated a brickyard and erected the first brick house in Phila-delphia. Pennsylvania history indicates the first brick house was owned by Robert Turner and was built on the corner of Front & Mulberry (Arch) Street. Richard married Dorothy in 1693. Dorothy, a Quaker, was apparently a very free spirit since Richard was a member of the Church of England and they were married “out of meeting” meaning not in a Quaker Church. In 1703 in Delaware, Dorothy, wife of Richard Cantrell, was accused of “masking in men’s clothes the day after Christmas and walking and dancing in the house of John Simes at 9 or 10 o’clock at night”. John Simes, who gave the masquerade party, was charged with a disorderly house, “a nursery of debotchery for ye inhabitants and youth of this city … To ye grief for and disturbance of mind and propagating ye throne of wickedness amongst us.” Children of Richard and Dorothy: i. Mary, born 01-06-1694 and died as an infant. ii. Joseph, born 1695 iii. Zebulon, born about 1697 in Philadelphia iv. Dorothy


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     Angela Cantrelladded this on 26 Sep 2011
     gilbertps1originally submitted this to gilbert Family Tree on 11 Jan 2009

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  • History from One World Tree site

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  • ID: I3807
  • Name: RICHARD L. CANTRELL
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: May 1666 in BAKEWELL, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND
  • Death: 31 May 1753 in PHILADELPHA, PA
  • Baptism: CHURCH OF ENGLAND
  • INFO: OCCUPATION: OWNED A BRICK YARD
  • Note:

    Children of Richard Cantrill and Dorothy Jones are:
    2. i. JOSEPH2 CANTRILL, b. ca 1695, Philadelphia, PA.
    ii. MARY CANTRILL.
    iii. ZEBULON CANTRILL.
    iv. DOROTHY CANTRILL.

    Dorothy came to America in 1682 on the Submission, the last of William
    Penn’s 23 ships which brought the first Quakers to Pennsylvania. Richard
    was in Philadelphia by 1689. He received three acres between 5th and 6th
    Streets, and was to build a one a half story brick house on it, as well as
    plant an apple orchard and build a fence. Dorothy married Richard “out of
    meeting”, but evidently returned because daughter Mary’s burial is listed
    in Friends records. In 1753 a caveat was issued against “surveying the
    land adjoining Richard Cantrill’s Estate issuing to the heirs or executors
    of the said Richard Cantrill.”

    A submission to the World Family Tree (Volume 3 #888) claims that Richard
    is the son of Joseph2 Cantrill (William1), who arrived in Jamestown, VA in
    April 1608 on the Phenix, and who was “surmised to be present at the
    baptism and marriage of Pocahontas.”

    #888 has this to say about Richard and Dorothy: “[Richard] was resident
    of Philadelphia, PA. Was a bricklayer. Came from Derbyshire branch of
    family in England. Descendant of William Cantrell. Died before 1753.
    Belonged to the Church of England. Built the first brick house in
    Philadelphia. Dorothy loved gaiety and society.” Unfortunately, 888
    offers no proof that Richard’s father was 1608 immigrant Joseph. Would
    that it were so and we were descended from a witness to the marriage of
    Pocahontas.

    Father: RICHARD L. CANTRELL b: 1630 in BLAKELY PARISH, DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND
    Mother: ALICE UNKNOWN b: ABT 1635 in DERBYSHIRE, ENGLAND

    Marriage 1 DOROTHY JONES b: 1672 in FLINT, WALES

    • Married: 1693 in PHILADELPHA, PA

    Children

    1. JOSEPH CANTRELL b: 1693 in PHILADELPHA, PA
    2. DOROTHY CANTRELL b: 1694
    3. MARY CANTRELL b: 6 Jan 1694/95
    4. ZEBULON CANTRELL b: ABT 1697

 Angela Cantrelladded this on 26 Sep 2011
 kestromoriginally submitted this to Stromberg-Teigen-Hendrix-White Family Tree on 10 Jan 2009

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  • Derbyshire England

  • Richard Cantrell was born about 1660 in Derbyshire, England.  He was a brickmaker and brickmason.  He migrated to the Province of Pennsylvania in the year of its establishment, 1682.  According to tradition, he built the first brick house in Philadelphia.  It is possible that it was the house of William Penn, which stands in Fairmont Park and was built of brick brought from England as ballast in the ship, “Welcome”, which brought William Penn to America.

    Richard married Dorothy Jones about 1693.  She was a daughter of Ellis and Jane Jones, Quakers, who came to America in 1682 in the ship “Submission”.  Dorothy was born in 1672 in Wales, England.  Ellis Jones was a weaver and a servant to the Governor.

    In 1692 Richard was granted a warrant for 30 ft lot on Third Street near the buring ground.  In 1693, he sold this lot to Thomas Hall.  In 1702 he received a lease for three acres and sixty perches between Fifth and Sixth Street.  He was to build a brick house and plant an orchard.  The date of Richards or Dorothy’s death is not known.  In 1730 and 1732, the will of Jane Jones mentioned three of the children of Richard and Dorothy.  The records of Race Street Meetinghouse contain the burial record of one child.

    Children:  1.  Mary.   2. Joseph,  3. Zebulon,  4. Dorothy

     Angela Cantrelladded this on 26 Sep 2011
     hjcantrelloriginally submitted this to Cantrell Family Tree on 30 Jun 2009

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  • Notes on Richard Cantrell

  • Richard’s shire of birth was established from a petition that he submitted to John Blackwell, Esq., governor of the Province of Pennsylvania, in July of July of 1689 stating that his nephew, Joseph Cantril had drowned in the Schuykull River, 10 May 1689, and that Joseph had older and younger brother’s in Derbyshire, England. He posted a bond of one hundred pounds. This document is on file at the register of Wills, City Hall Philadelphia. Pa. Admin. book A page 66, file no. 54.

    Another Family trees notes regarding Richard: “It is known from the tax records of Derbyshire that there were several Cantril (Cantrell) family’s living in the area at the time of Richards birth. In 1986 a researcher found one Richard Cantril’s Baptismal record in Derbyshire, England with the parents listed as Richard and Alice Cantril. This Richard was born on May 13, 1666 in the Parish of Bakewell. In the nearby Parish of Ashover there is another record of a Joseph Cantril’s christening, recorded as 23 Dec, 1666. He was the son of William and Elizabeth Cantril. Last there is a family listed by the name of Richard and Mary Cantril in Bakewell Parish in 1694 and 97. Any one of these could be our set of missing parents. According to land records and family lore Richard was thought to be a Brick Mason and possibly operated a brickyard in PA. No record has been found at this time of either a Richard or Joseph Cantril’s immigration in the 1680s. It is said by some that he erected the first brick house in the city of Pa. but no record has been found to establish this fact. It is known that the house belong to one Robert Turner and was built on the SW corner of Front and Mulberry (arch) street. From a letter written by Mr.Turner to William Penn dated August 3, 1685, ” And since I built my brick house the foundation of which was laid ar they going…” The next record of Richard and Dorothy is in the 1703 Delaware court records found among the grand jury presentments.Dorothy Cantril , presented for masking in men’s cloths the day after Christmas. Walking and dancing in the house of John Simes at 9 or 10 at night. John Simes who gave the masquerade party was presented for keeping a disorderly house, ” A nursery of de botch ye inhabitants and youth of this city.. to ye grief of and disturbance of peaceful minds and propagating ye throne of wickedness amongst us.” From a will and burial records four children can be verified as Richards. There is a Jane ??? and Mary Price mentioned in the will who might also be children. PENNSYLVANNIA ARCHIVES A RECORD OF LAND.Caveat against surveying of land adjoining Richard Cantrill’s estate, issuing to the heirs or executors of said Richard Cantrill, or any under him, 31 May, 1753. As the two son’s of Richard left the New Castle area in the late 1720′s or early 1730 and moved to the valley of Virginia by 1738, Richard may have also made the move.”

    Unfortunately, I failed to write the source of this information down.  My apologies to the researcher.

     Angela Cantrelladded this on 26 Sep 2011
     Cynthia Hermannoriginally submitted this to Mitchell Family on 9 Mar 2009

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  • I666: Richard CANTRIL (ABT 1660 – 1753)

  • Richard CANTRIL

    • BIRTH: ABT 1660, Derbyshire, England
    • DEATH: 1753

    Family 1: Dorothy JONES

    • MARRIAGE: ABT 1693, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
    1. Mary CANTRIL
    2. Joseph CANTRIL
    3. Zebulon CANTRIL
    4. Dorothy CANTRIL

    __ __ __–Richard CANTRIL ____ __


    INDEXNotesThe estimated year of Richard’s birth has been established by assuming that he had reached his majority when he came to America in 1682. His place of birth has been established from a petition he submitted to John Blackwell, Esquire, Governor of the Providence of Pennsylvania, in July 1689, stating that his nephew, Joseph Cantrill, had drowned in the Schuykill River, 10 May 1689, and

    that Joseph had older and younger brothers in Derbyshire, England. Richard posted a 100 pound bond. This document is on file at the Register of Wills, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Administrative Book “A”, page 66, file number 54, 1689. We know from the records of Derbyshire that there were a number of Cantrill families in the shire and that they were closely associated with the St. Alkmunds Church in Derby. A search of the Derbyshire Parish Registers in 1979 failed to reveal a record of Richard’s ancestry. It has been impossible to find records to prove the parentage, or birthplace of Richard Cantril, but there is no doubt that he came from the Derbyshire branch of the English family. He may have been a descendent of William or Henry Cantrell of Virginia. Fisher says, in his “Making of Pennsylvania,” that “quite a number of Virginians migrated from that Colony to the banks of the Delaware before the settlement of Philadelphia by William Penn, in 1678, under the rule of the Duke of York.”

    We know from tradition and provincial records that Richard was a brickmason and the operator of a brick factory. His arrival in America has been estimated based upon several facts of historical significance. King Charles II of England owed a vast sum of money to a wealthy English Admiral named Penn, and when the Admiral died, his son William Penn inherited the debt. The

    King was willing to settle the debt by granting Penn an enormous tract of land in the New World. William had become a Quaker during his college years, and was continuously in trouble with the English crown. Now was his chance to form a Quaker colony where they could worship in peace. He needed artisans and families to successfully claim “Penn’s Forest.” The King did not favor the migration of craftsmen, particularly the type needed by Penn. However, during this period, a wealthy Englishman could obtain a license to migrate and take with him as many servants and their families as he desired. Penn devised a plan, whereby qualified craftsmen, who could afford to pay their passage (but were not otherwise allowed to leave England) would be signed on as servants, on the condition that upon landing in America, they would pay their masters the passage money, and in some cases receive land and be freemen. Numerous artisans, Quakers and others, joined the exodus to America with William Penn. By establishing the colony with qualified and capable personnel, it became the best administered colony in America.

    William Penn sailed for America to claim his land in the ship “Welcome” under master Robert Greenway. The ship arrived in Pennsylvania on the 24th day of the 8th month 1682, or in the present method of dating, 24 June 1682. The ship was ballasted with English brick instead of the usual stone because Penn had decided that he would live in adequate shelter instead of the caves and log huts of the New World. Neither the roster of the “Welcome” nor those of other ships arriving shortly afterwards lists a Richard Cantril, his nephew or any other brickmason. However, a Mary Cantril, servant to Nicholas Schull, arrived in America 10 May 1685. It is unlikely that Penn would have brought the bricks to America without having a qualified brickmason also. It has been a family tradition that Richard built the first brick house in Philadelphia. Historical records of Pennsylvania show that the first brick house belonged to Robert Turner and was located at the corner of First and Mulberry (Arch) Streets. Robert was a wealthy merchant from Dublin who arrived in 1683 and had his house built in 1684-85. In the same years, Daniel Pegge, a future brother-in-law of Richard’s, had a brick house built in “Pegge’s Run.” It is possible that Richard Cantril had the contract for erecting both of these houses, which would easily account for the tradition in the family.

    From “Pennsylvania Archives”, Vol XIX: “At a meeting of the Commissioners, 6th of July, 1692. Present Captain William Markham, Robert Turner, John Goodson, … Richard Cantril requesting a warrant for a lot of 30 ft. upon Third Street, near the Burying Ground, was granted.”

    From the Original Records, Deed Book “D” 53, page 50: “Richard Cantril to Thomas Hall, sold 30 ft. X 190 ft. May 13, 1693, Third and Market Streets.”

    In Patent Book “A” Vol II, page 344, there is a lease for 21 years (May 5, 1702) made by Edward Shippen, Griffith Owen and James Logan, as Proprietary and Governor in Chief of Pennsylvania and Territories thereunto belonging … of a …”Certain tract of land between Fifth and Sixth Streets containing three acres and sixty perches’ (Here follows a full description by metes and bounds) to Richard Cantril, Brickmaker, with all woods and underwood and trees ways, waters, water courses, liberties, profits, commodities, advantages, and opportunities whatsoever.” The rental was forty shillings per year, “current silver money of the Province”…”Said Richard Cantril shall build, erect, and set up a substantial brick house one story and a half in height an in breadth eighteen feet and in length thirty-six feet; the first story of one brick and a half and the second story of one brick, and further that said Richard Cantril shall make an orchard upon some part of the hereby granted land, with at least eighty good bearing apple trees planted thereon, and shall also well and sufficiently fence and enclose the said demised land.”

    In “Pennsylvania Archives” we find: “Cantrill, Old Rights: Richard Cantril, city lot 3 acres, 10 day, 10 month, 1701. Rich, return 3 acres, 3 month 1702.”

    Later the Archives record a “Caveat against surveying of land adjoining Richard Cantril’s estate, issuing to the heirs, or executors of the said Richard Cantril, or any under him, May 31, 1753.” No record could be found of the disposition of the estate of Richard Cantril, either by his heirs or executors, but he evidently died prior to May 31, 1753.

    !SOURCE: Cantrell Family History, Glenda Ruth Densmore Harrel, Edgecliff, TX

    !Reference: Early Families of the North Carolina Counties of Rockingham and Stokes with Revolutionary Service”, compiled and published by members of James Hunter Chapter, National Society of Daughters of American Revolution of Madison, North Carolina, published 1977.

    !Reference: Warren G. Cantrell, 1913 Willowbend, Killeen, TX 76543, February 1990.


    Created by GED2HTML v2.4a-UNREGISTERED (1/1/96) on Sun Jun 09 18:09:04 1996

     Angela Cantrelladded this on 26 Sep 2011
     roytcanoriginally submitted this to Roy Cantrell and Wanda Luna Family Tree on 16 Feb 2009

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Richard Cantrill was a member of the Church of England.  Against the family wishes he married a Quaker, Miss Dorothy Jones (1672-1727) from Wales.

Richard was a friend of William Penn.  He was also the founder of the first brick factory in America, along with his partner, Daniel Peggy.  They built the first brick house in Philadelphia.  Some of their brick houses can still be seen on what used to be called Peggy’s Run and is now called Willow Street.

 Angela Cantrelladded this on 26 Sep 2011
 bevlsoriginally submitted this to DeLong/Milligan/Odom Family Treeon 4 Sep 2008

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SOURCE: Cantrell Family Genealogy Forum, Msg. #7077, 29 Apr 2009

The proof of Richard’s arrival in Philadelphia is in: Pennsylvania. Land Office. Copied Surveys, 1682-1912. Harrisburg, Penn: Pennsylvania State Archives, nd., Survey Book D-85, p112. which says in part: “At the request of Philip Howel that we would grant him to take up fifty acres of head land in right of Richard Cantril who came into this Province about the first settling thereof servant to Capt Wm Smith … Province of Philadia ye ninth of 9br 1702″ Other soucments show that William Smith was Master of the Bristol Merchant which arrived in Philadelphia This source: Sheppard, Walter Lee, Jr. “Digest of Ship and Passenger Arrivals in the Delaware.” In: Sheppard, Walter Lee, Jr., compiler and editor. Passengers and Ships prior to 1684. (Publications of the Welcome Society of Pennsylvania, 1.) Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1970. 245p. Reprinted by Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1985. pp. 21-25., 122-123 gives this information: “1683: no. 1; name: Bristol Merchant; Size: 300 T; Master: William Smith; Port of Registry: Bristol; Loading dates: 24 Oct-3 Dec 1682; Arrival in Delaware: by 9 Feb 1682/3; No. Pass.: ?” So it appears Richard arrived about 9 Feb 1683 on the Bristol Merchant which sialed from Bristol in Dec 1682. There has been no list of passenger found yet.

Source: Karen T. Zachary originally submitted this to *Treadway/Long on 19 Aug 2009

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Collected fom this website: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/a/y/Lyndall-J-Mayes/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0186.html

Richard L. Cantrell (b. May 1666, d. Bef. May 30, 1753)

Richard L. Cantrell was born May 1666 in Derbyshire, England, and died Bef. May 30, 1753 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married Dorothy Jones on March 05, 1690/91 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, daughter of Ellis Jones and Ellen Jane.

 Includes NotesNotes for Richard L. Cantrell:
Richard Cantrell, sometimes spelled; Cantril, was born about May 1666 and christened on May 13, 1666 in Bakewell, Derbyshire, England. He came to America in about 1687 to join relatives. His place of birth has been established from a petition he submitted to John Blackwell, Esquire, Governor of the Providence of Pennsylvania, in July 1689, stating that his nephew, Joseph Cantrill, had drowned in the Schuykill River, 10 May 1689, and that Joseph had older and younger brothers in Derbyshire, England. Richard posted a 100 pound bond. This document is on file at the Register of Wills, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Administrative Book “A”, page 66, file number 54, 1689. We know from the records of Derbyshire that there were a number of Cantrill families in the shire and that they were closely associated with the St. Alkmunds Church in Derby. He may have been a descendent of William or Henry Cantrell of Virginia. Fisher says, in his “Making of Pennsylvania,” that “quite a number of Virginians migrated from that Colony to the banks of the Delaware before the settlement of Philadelphia by William Penn, in 1678, under the rule of the Duke of York.”

We know from tradition and provincial records that Richard was a brickmason and the operator of a brick factory. His arrival in America has been estimated based upon several facts of historical significance. King Charles II of England owed a vast sum of money to a wealthy English Admiral named Penn, and when the Admiral died, his son William Penn inherited the debt. The King was willing to settle the debt by granting Penn an enormous tract of land in the New World. William had become a Quaker during his college years, and was continuously in trouble with the English crown. Now was his chance to form a Quaker colony where they could worship in peace. He needed artisans and families to successfully claim “Penn’s Forest.” The King did not favor the migration of craftsmen, particularly the type needed by Penn. However, during this period, a wealthy Englishman could obtain a license to migrate and take with him as many servants and their families as he desired. Penn devised a plan, whereby qualified craftsmen, who could afford to pay their passage (but were not otherwise allowed to leave England) would be signed on as servants, on the condition that upon landing in America, they would pay their masters the passage money, and in some cases receive land and be freemen. Numerous artisans, Quakers and others, joined the exodus to America with William Penn. By establishing the colony with qualified and capable personnel, it became the best administered colony in America.

William Penn sailed for America to claim his land in the ship “Welcome” under master Robert Greenway. The ship arrived in Pennsylvania on the 24th day of the eighth month of 1682, or in the present method of dating, 24 June 1682. The ship was ballasted with English brick instead of the usual stone because Penn had decided that he would live in adequate shelter instead of the caves and log huts of the New World. Neither the roster of the “Welcome” nor those of other ships arriving shortly afterwards lists a Richard Cantril, his nephew or any other brickmason. However, a Mary Cantril, servant to Nicholas Schull, arrived in America 10 May 1685. It is unlikely that Penn would have brought the bricks to America without having a qualified brickmason also. It has been a family tradition that Richard built the first brick house in Philadelphia. Historical records of Pennsylvania show that the first brick house belonged to Robert Turner and was located at the corner of First and Mulberry (Arch) Streets. Robert was a wealthy merchant from Dublin who arrived in 1683 and had his house built in 1684-85. In the same years, Daniel Pegge, a future brother-in-law of Richard’s, had a brick house built in “Pegge’s Run.” It is possible that Richard Cantril had the contract for erecting both of these houses, which would easily account for the tradition in the family.

From “Pennsylvania Archives”, Vol XIX: “At a meeting of the Commissioners, 6th of July, 1692. Present Captain William Markham, Robert Turner, John Goodson, … Richard Cantril requesting a warrant for a lot of 30 ft. upon Third Street, near the Burying Ground, was granted.”

From the Original Records, Deed Book “D” 53, page 50: “Richard Cantril to Thomas Hall, sold 30 ft. X 190 ft. May 13, 1693, Third and Market Streets.”

In about 1693 Richard Cantrill married Dorothy Jones, daughter of Ellis and Jane Jones, who came to America from either Flint, or Denbigh, Wales, in the ship Submission, Sept., 1682.
From the Log of the Submission:
‘Ellis Jones, age 45, Barbara Jones, age 13, Dorothy Jones, age 10, Jane Jones, age 40, Mary Jones, age 12, Isaac Jones, age 4 mos.’

The ‘Pennsylvania Historical Magazine,’ in a list of names of ‘Important Colonists, who came in the Submission,’ mentions Ellis Jones. He was a resident of Bucks county, 1684, but did not remain there long, and in the Welsh Tract Purchases his name appears as having purchased one hundred acres in Nantonell Parish, Radnor. Barbara Jones married Daniel Pegg, of ‘Pegge’s Run;’ Mary Jones married her cousin Isaac Jones, and Dorothy Jones married Richard Cantrill. Ellis Jones and his family were Quakers and as Richard Cantrill belonged to the Church of England, Richard and Dorothy were married, to use a Quaker term, ‘Out of Meeting.’

Dorothy Jones Cantrill seems to have been a young lady of considerable spirit and independence of character. She not only married the man of her choice, irrespective of her religious training, but later evidence is found of her love of gayety and society in an old history of Philadelphia, where she figured at a masquerade ball, much to the horror of her more quiet Quaker friends. She seems to have inherited her love of society from her mother, for the name of Jane Jones appears as a witness to the marriage of a great many Quakers of her day, and the Quaker weddings were probably the principal events affording those of that sect an expression to their social instinct.

In Patent Book “A” Vol II, page 344, there is a lease for 21 years (May 5, 1702) made by Edward Shippen, Griffith Owen and James Logan, as Proprietary and Governor in Chief of Pennsylvania and Territories thereunto belonging … of a …”Certain tract of land between Fifth and Sixth Streets containing three acres and sixty perches’ (Here follows a full description by metes and bounds) to Richard Cantril, Brickmaker, with all woods and underwood and trees ways, waters, water courses, liberties, profits, commodities, advantages, and opportunities whatsoever.” The rental was forty shillings per year, “current silver money of the Province”…”Said Richard Cantril shall build, erect, and set up a substantial brick house one story and a half in height an in breadth eighteen feet and in length thirty-six feet; the first story of one brick and a half and the second story of one brick, and further that said Richard Cantril shall make an orchard upon some part of the hereby granted land, with at least eighty good bearing apple trees planted thereon, and shall also well and sufficiently fence and enclose the said demised land.”

In “Pennsylvania Archives” we find: “Cantrill, Old Rights: Richard Cantril, city lot 3 acres, 10 day, 10 month, 1701. Rich, return 3 acres, 3 month 1702.”

As the two sons left the New Castle area in the late 1720s or early 1730 and moved to the valley of Virginia by 1738. Richard may have also made the move.

The will of Jane Jones (Richard Cantrell’s mother-in-law), relict of Ellis Jones, executed at Phildelphia, Aug. 3, 1730, and recorded at Philadelphia, Dec. 27, 1732, mentions her grandchildren: ‘Zebulon Cantril, Joseph Cantril, and Dorothy Cantril,’ to each of whom she bequeaths: ‘One English shilling, or the value of it in coyn current.’

Later the Archives record a “Caveat against surveying of land adjoining Richard Cantril’s estate, issuing to the heirs, or executors of the said Richard Cantril, or any under him, May 31, 1753.” No record could be found of the disposition of the estate of Richard Cantril, either by his heirs or executors, but he evidently died prior to May 31, 1753.

SOURCE: Cantrell Family History, Glenda Ruth Densmore Harrel, Edgecliff, TX
Early Families of the North Carolina Counties of Rockingham and Stokes with Revolutionary Service”, compiled and published by members of James Hunter Chapter, National Society of Daughters of American Revolution of Madison, North Carolina, published 1977.
Warren G. Cantrell, 1913 Willowbend, Killeen, TX 76543, February 1990.

More About Richard L. Cantrell:
Baptism: May 13, 1666, Bakewell Parish, Derbyshire, England.

More About Richard L. Cantrell and Dorothy Jones:
Marriage: March 05, 1690/91, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Children of Richard L. Cantrell and Dorothy Jones are:

  1. Mary Cantrell, b. 1694, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. January 06, 1694/95, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  2. +Joseph C. Cantrell, b. Abt. 1695, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 1770, New Castle, Lawrence Co. Pennsylvania.
  3. Zebulon Cantrell, b. 1697, Philadelphia, Montgomery Co. Pennsylvania.
  4. Dorothy Cantrell, b. 1699, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. Aft. 1730.
  5. Mary Cantrell, b. Abt. 1701.
  6. Jane Cantrell, b. Abt. 1703.

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Find-A-Grave link: Richard Cantrell

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=CAN&GSpartial=1&GSbyrel=all&GSst=40&GScntry=4&GSsr=3641&GRid=75617345&#038;

Says Richard’s middle initial is “L” and that he traveled over on the ship Welcome (William Penn’s ship), and that he is buried at Old Swedes Church.

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One Response to Richard Cantrell, 1666 – 1753

  1. I am looking for information about Jane or Jean Cantil who married Jesse (John) Brackin in Orange Co. NC. 20 March 1790. She would be his second wife. Thank you for any help.

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